Environment

Investigates the way that nature is enrolled in, and a site of, social and cultural politics, attending specifically to discourses, governance and practice.

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Being earthbound: Arendt, process and alienation in the Anthropocene

Hannah Arendt developed a twofold account of ‘being earthbound’ directly relevant to Anthropocene debates regarding the political. For Arendt, both senses of ‘being earthbound’ arose as humans began to act into nature, not merely upon it.

By

Oliver Belcher, Jeremy J Schmidt

“Exceeding Beringia”: Upending universal human events and wayward transits in Arctic spaces

In this article I examine the enlistment of Arctic ice to tell grand, universal stories about humanity’s origins and endings. To upend temperate-normative ideals of landscape and livelihood, I analyze a poem titled “Exceeding Beringia” by Joan Naviyuk Kane (Inupiaq) wherein Inupiaq relations to more-than-human kin articulate transit and migration as a mutual, obligatory responsibility.

By

Jen Rose Smith

Agribiopolitics: The health of plants and humans in the age of monocrops

Using Paraguay as a site of genealogical engagement, this paper by Kregg Hetherington explores agribiopolitical relations through three phases of the Green Revolution, culminating in the current age of monocrops.

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Kregg Hetherington

Toxic sights: The spectacle of hazardous waste removal

By attending to chemicals through the mundane work of removal, Angeliki Balayannis' paper opens up different lines of inquiry for studies of waste, and enriches understandings of materiality by considering how visual representations make a difference.

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Angeliki Balayannis

Toxic landfills, survivor trees, and dust cloud memories: More-than-human ecologies of 9/11 memory

In foregrounding ecologies of “9/11” memory and memorialization, this essay draws on more-than-human approaches that emphasize how both human and nonhuman matter and memory emerge from and transform each other in and around lower Manhattan.

By

Jacque Micieli-Voutsinas, Julia Cavicchi

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